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See the machine-made section of the Bottle Bases page for more information on these scars. with distinct suction scars were likely Owens machine produced.)6. Machine-made bottles tend to have few if any bubbles in the glass and the thickness of the glass is usually more uniform throughout the bottle as compared to mouth-blown bottles.(Note: It is likely that other types of suction based automatic bottle machines made in Europe in the 1920s - and possibly later - also produced a suction scar on the base of their products [Pearson 1928]. The presence of a circular valve mark on the base of a bottle (typically a wide mouth bottle or jar) is sure evidence of machine-made manufacture by a press-and-blow machine. This is especially true of later machine made bottles, i.e. (Note: The presence or absence of bubbles in the glass and relatively even distribution of the glass throughout the characteristic is not a primary feature of either machine-made or mouth-blown bottles, though there are strong trends.Click on ghost seam to view a close-up explanatory picture of this attribute.Be aware that bottles and jars made by early to mid-20th century press-and-blow machines do not usually have ghost seams, since the parison mold was usually one-piece, but will typically have a valve mark on the base (see #6 below). A suction scar is present on the base of Owens Automatic Bottle Machine produced bottles.

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"Ghost" seams are usually present on the neck, shoulder, and/or body of the bottle if made by a blow-and-blow machine (like the Owens Automatic Bottle Machine).

Bottles which have all the primary characteristics noted above (#1, #3, #4) bottles.

It was noted in 1910 that the Cumberland Glass Company (Bridgeton, NJ) had "...succeeded in perfecting a machine that will satisfactorily produce narrow neck bottles, such as catsups, beer bottles, etc., at a big saving over the hand method." The method used was unusual and may have been unique in bottle-making history: "The machine differs from all others, and in getting the neck upon the bottle, the vessel is made in two sections, the neck being put upon the bowl with a second operation. Manager says machines are fast coming into play in bottle industry, plans eventually to have machines in place of "carrying in boys." Location: Clarksburg, West Virginia" (Library of Congress).

These are faint, somewhat wandering, hairline seams which if present (usually) are sporadically visible on the sides of machine-made bottles.

The ghost seams are caused by the parison mold parts and if visible enough will be "attached" to the vertical seams in the finish.

"Ghost" seams are usually present on the neck, shoulder, and/or body of the bottle if made by a blow-and-blow machine (like the Owens Automatic Bottle Machine).Bottles which have all the primary characteristics noted above (#1, #3, #4) bottles.It was noted in 1910 that the Cumberland Glass Company (Bridgeton, NJ) had "...succeeded in perfecting a machine that will satisfactorily produce narrow neck bottles, such as catsups, beer bottles, etc., at a big saving over the hand method." The method used was unusual and may have been unique in bottle-making history: "The machine differs from all others, and in getting the neck upon the bottle, the vessel is made in two sections, the neck being put upon the bowl with a second operation. Manager says machines are fast coming into play in bottle industry, plans eventually to have machines in place of "carrying in boys." Location: Clarksburg, West Virginia" (Library of Congress).These are faint, somewhat wandering, hairline seams which if present (usually) are sporadically visible on the sides of machine-made bottles.The ghost seams are caused by the parison mold parts and if visible enough will be "attached" to the vertical seams in the finish.the suction scar on the base (point #5 above and picture to the left) can date no earlier than 1905 and are usually post-1910.