Dating rusearch

11-Sep-2017 16:41

One such developing interest to researchers is the way humans create and re-create their personal identities.

An individual's identity can be defined as the "cognitive and affective understanding of who and what we are" (Schouten, 1991, p413).

In fact, several dating services encourage participants to "'update' their profiles to reflect personal changes that have occurred since they first posted their profiles" (Yurchisin, Watchravesringkan, & Mc Cable, 2005, p739).

Starling (2000) reported: "It's easy to make up an identity in cyberspace.

Further, Hollander (2004) indicated that "implausible self-presentations are attention getting efforts, overselling oneself is a response to keen competition for partners not easy to locate" (p75).

Marked by constant change, postmodern society now "infiltrates every sphere of social life" (Morgado, 1996, p44).Research conducted by Schau and Gilly (2003) demonstrated that consumers utilize personal website postings to learn about themselves and communicate aspects of their identities to others.Moreover, "if identity is truly a social phenomenon as intimated by the symbolic interactionist perspective (Blumer, 1969; Cooley, 1902; Mead, 1934), then feedback from others would be an important part of the identity creation and re-creation process"(Yurchisin, Watchravesringkan, & Mc Cable, 2005, p736).Sociological issues that potentially impact Internet dating include social capital and social support. A conclusion will be offered that details implications for further research.Keywords Identity; Internet Dating; Social Capital; Social Support; Symbolic Interactionist Perspective From a historical perspective, "Internet dating" can be tracked back to the mid-1960s when early computers were used to match individuals by comparing data derived from questionnaires.

Marked by constant change, postmodern society now "infiltrates every sphere of social life" (Morgado, 1996, p44).Research conducted by Schau and Gilly (2003) demonstrated that consumers utilize personal website postings to learn about themselves and communicate aspects of their identities to others.Moreover, "if identity is truly a social phenomenon as intimated by the symbolic interactionist perspective (Blumer, 1969; Cooley, 1902; Mead, 1934), then feedback from others would be an important part of the identity creation and re-creation process"(Yurchisin, Watchravesringkan, & Mc Cable, 2005, p736).Sociological issues that potentially impact Internet dating include social capital and social support. A conclusion will be offered that details implications for further research.Keywords Identity; Internet Dating; Social Capital; Social Support; Symbolic Interactionist Perspective From a historical perspective, "Internet dating" can be tracked back to the mid-1960s when early computers were used to match individuals by comparing data derived from questionnaires.Internet dating itself can be characterized by a "seamless movement between reading descriptions, writing responses, and exchanging messages.