Updating zoneinfo

04-Apr-2018 23:19

After doing so, the following was returned: [email protected]:~# dpkg-reconfigure tzdata Current default time zone: ‘Etc/GMT’ Local time is now: Mon Mar 11 GMT 2013. [email protected]:~# [email protected]:~# date Mon Mar 11 GMT 2013 [email protected]:~# I have a simple cronjob to test cron: [email protected]:~# crontab -l 16 17 * * * touch /tmp/But nothing shows up in /tmp, and nothing in the logs. Reply Could be, I know if you change the timezone of the system you have to restart cron for it to pick that change up. I know on Ubuntu as soon as you start up the OS cron starts automatically. Reply You should also restart a number of other processes, not just cron. Syslog (or any of its cousins) is one, otherwise you’ll get wrong timestamps. This article seeks to provide information regarding the leap seconds themselves, along with addressing how Red Hat Enterprise Linux handles the insertion of one.At this time, we are not aware of upcoming leap second events.I find it’s pretty annoying when you have to go log file spelunking only to find all the timestamps are in UTC.But we can set the timezone of the server so when Rails, cron, scripts, etc run, they output more readable dates.Several time dissemination services also propagate the announcement of a leap second after this has been determined by the IERS.

updating zoneinfo-81

The time does not continue to increase monotonically but it is stepped by one second.

In the past all leap seconds had been inserted at either one of those times(*).

Announcements whether a leap second is scheduled or not are published by the IERS in their Bulletin C.

Let's have a look at the time stamps of a leap second which is inserted, and the second after that leap second: We can normalize the time and date of the leap second: 60 seconds are 1 minute, which lets the minutes increment from 59 to 60 60 minutes are 1 hour, which lets the hours increment from 23 to 24 24 hours are 1 day, which lets the date increment, and so on.

Finally we can say that both lines represent exactly the same time, or 2 consequent seconds have the same time stamp.

The time does not continue to increase monotonically but it is stepped by one second.In the past all leap seconds had been inserted at either one of those times(*).Announcements whether a leap second is scheduled or not are published by the IERS in their Bulletin C.Let's have a look at the time stamps of a leap second which is inserted, and the second after that leap second: We can normalize the time and date of the leap second: 60 seconds are 1 minute, which lets the minutes increment from 59 to 60 60 minutes are 1 hour, which lets the hours increment from 23 to 24 24 hours are 1 day, which lets the date increment, and so on.Finally we can say that both lines represent exactly the same time, or 2 consequent seconds have the same time stamp.You can check your current timezone by just running I’m still struggling with this.